19.2.10

Boys and Reading: Tips for Making Reading “Boy-Friendly” : The Childrens Book Review


I was talking with a friend of mine about a month back and she asked me if I had difficulty with getting my boys to read.  I didn't really have an answer for the question because I didn't remember the issue ever coming up and am not 100% sure I ever really identified with her inquiry as an issue--I thought nothing of it but then I began to watch them, times when I actually offered them books or a simple story time especially during the days light and guess what I found...


Here are just a few examples of responses I have received in the past week from my male children.  These kids have over 100 story books in their room and.....ya.....no more comments on that!


"Myles do you want to come have story time-bring me a nice book!" --"No Thanks Mommy!--I'm going to play the drums!"

"Aid bring a book, I'm gonna read to you!'--"Aren't we going to the 'Y' soon?"

"You guys want a story?" --"If we do...can we watch TV after?"


Their book selection does not suck! When kids come over they hop the toys and hit the books, but these boys just want to go and go and go and see. Very active and very visual.

In our house we do literacy things that don't always involve sitting down with a book (but in writing this post I vow that both my sons will one day be avid readers and book enthusiasts ;)). We SURF the web together, PLAY board games, COOK and WRITE stories and some pretty funky songs. We "keep busy" but now I am pressed to "keep busy" with a little more purpose since the wonderful world of Google and Twitter have enlightened me once again with some good blogged information (that seems pretty true to me!).

Reading this article (the one linked at the END of this post) brought a funny story to mind, one that we made up last year called "Tag You're It". A big story with over 100 words and surprisingly my kids love it more than the books we acquire for them (by cash and other means) and they can read it themselves now.  Hold on! It's action packed, amazing and it goes like this:


TAG, YOU'RE IT!
By Aidan, Myles and Christine J.


Riiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii-NG

Run, run, run, run, run, run, run, run, run, run, run, run, run, run, run, run, run! --"TAG, YOU'RE IT!"

Run, run, run, run, run, run, run, run, run, run, run, run, run, run, run, run, run! --"TAG, YOU'RE IT!"

Run, run, run, run, run, run, run, run, run, run, run, run, run, run, run, run, run! --"TAG, YOU'RE IT!"

Run, run, run, run, run, run, run, run, run, run, run, run, run, run, run, run, run! --"TAG, YOU'RE IT!"

Run, run, run, run, run, run, run, run, run, run, run, run, run, run, run, run, run! --"TAG, YOU'RE IT!"

Riiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii-NG



The End


Pretty impressive hey? It's probably one of those tales that is better said then read so, I'll continue on getting some active media up on this blog. Because writing stories is one thing but there is nothing quite like a good story told!




CJ


check out this article it is full of great advice:
 Boys and Reading: Tips for Making Reading “Boy-Friendly” : The Childrens Book Review

3 comments:

  1. When I was doing my Education degree I did a series of research papers on Boys and Reading (boring, academia). However, the most interesting thing I found was that if a parent of the same gender shows an interest in reading, their child is SIGNIFICANTLY more likely to enjoy reading.
    Also, what you do with your boys (reading them stories they have helped write) is one of the best ways to engage kids- I do it with my grade 5 class and they love nothing more then reading/hearing their words out loud!

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  2. It's true-the gender point---I was a little offended at first and felt as though in some way the male children were betraying me- I am arguably a better story reader then my other half (I said arguably Derek don't take it personally!) I actually practice reading stories before I read them to my kids. Then at bedtime I'll tell them it is time for a story and ask them what they want me to read???? and more time then not-they ignore the question and say "we want Daddy to read to us!" hmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm? ;)

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  3. Sadly, I do agree with the gender point. I do face the problems many parents face with boys and reading. Despite no male influence my son 4 yrs Rhu old can read. Like, CJ I spend alot of time reading to him and teaching him to read. I even have a tutor for him when I am away him , but it takes alot for him - well when I am the 'teacher' to sit and read or to be read to. This worried me alot. I wondered about him coping at school. I wondered how the teachers thought about my parenting. I wondered about what his friends said about him to their parents. Queries with his teachers made me relaxed. My son, Rhu, actually likes to read at school and tell stories and asks the most questions.
    I just wish the Rhu at school could come home to my house!!!!!!!!

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